Brett Kavanaugh, Trump's Supreme Court nominee, helped write 'Starr Report'

Brett Kavanaugh, Trump's Supreme Court nominee, helped write 'Starr Report'

He launched a career that veered into Washington politics, including work on President George W. Bush's legal team for the 2000 presidential election recount in Florida.

The final hours of President Trump's decision-making on his second Supreme Court nominee are being described as hectic and unpredictable - and the president has still not made a decision. A global team of about 30 correspondents in New York, London, Hong Kong and other major cities provides expert analysis in real time.

Conservative judicial advocates say the judicial appointments are correcting the leftward tilt of the bench.

Kavanaugh, 53, is an ideological conservative who is expected to push the court to the right on a number of issues including business regulation and national security.

"Tomorrow I begin meeting with members of the Senate", he said.

Two candidates on President Donald Trump's list of potential Supreme Court nominees - federal appeals court Judges Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett - were singled out for praise Sunday by a top legal adviser to the president, indicating they remain prominent in the search.

Democrats are ramping up opposition to the president's eventual pick with a focus on the prospect that the candidate that's confirmed would vote to overturn Roe v. Wade, a decades-old ruling that struck down laws that criminalized or restricted access to abortions. "We can not let that happen". Both support a woman's right to have an abortion and will be looking for assurances that the nominee would not overturn the Roe v Wade decision establishing abortion rights.

"Fundamentally, it's been a precedent for a long time", she said. They see Trump and McConnell's revamping of the courts — in the face of Democratic filibusters that stall even popular nominees — as more important than even legislative victories. While he has yet to reveal his sentiments on the 1973 Supreme Court decision that established a constitutional right to abortion access, he was involved with a dispute over whether a pregnant migrant woman who was being held by immigration authorities could receive an abortion in 2017, according to the Los Angeles Times.

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The stakes are sky high for filling the opening created by Justice Anthony Kennedy's imminent retirement. Republicans now have a 51-49 majority - one more then it needs to confirm the nominee - but it is unlikely that Senator John McCain, who has been absent from the floor while he battles brain cancer, will return for a vote.

The confirmation process promises to be a fight, and Republicans have a narrow 51-49 majority - with nearly no room to lose votes as Republican Senator John McCain of Arizona remains absent while fighting brain cancer.

Republicans in the Senate need to be completely united on the pick, because of the delicate nature of their majority. Sen.

With Senator John McCain battling cancer in his home state of Arizona, Republicans can now only muster 50 votes.

That could imperil support from Republican moderates in the Senate, especially Alaska's Lisa Murkowski and Maine's Susan Collins. Susan Collins, of ME, to speak out, told Stephanopoulos last week that a candidate who would overturn Roe v. Wade "would not be acceptable", because it indicates an "activist agenda" she didn't want to see in a judge.

Meanwhile, the Trump administration has been targeting three Democratic senators who are up for re-election in red states that Trump won in 2016, including West Virginia Sen. Joe Donnelly, D-Ind., Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., and Joe Manchin, D-W.Va. - were also invited to the event but will not be attending.

In remarks he gave after his nomination was announced. Regardless of his choice, it's likely that the closely divided Senate will be holding a momentous confirmation vote just weeks before the midterm election. Relishing the guessing game beyond the White House gates, Trump had little to say about his choice before the announcement.