Trump's 100 days: A rattled establishment, some surprises

Trump's 100 days: A rattled establishment, some surprises

As the 100-day mark of Donald Trump's presidency approaches, a new CNN/ORC poll finds the President reaches this milestone holding on to the lowest approval rating of any newly-elected president at this stage, amid sharp partisan divides and a failure to capitalize on post-election strengths. If Trump never makes a statement of commitment, Trump supporters never have to confront what they really voted for.

In just his first few weeks in office Trump suffered some crippling blows - the federal courts halted his proposed travel ban, and Congress failed to move ahead on health care reform.

President Ronald Reagan's 100 days were considered the hardest-driving since FDR's time, even though Reagan was shot March 30, 1981.

An ABC News/Washington Post poll last week found that 42 percent of Americans asked approved of Trump, while 53 percent disapproved. That is the lowest rating for any president at this point in their first term since pollsters began asking about public approval in 1945. Asked in 1993 whether President Bill Clinton would do anything differently during his second 100 days in office, spokesman George Stephanopoulos joked: "He's not going to count the days, first of all".

The latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll asked Americans whether they thought the USA government should be run more like a business.

In listing President's Donald Trump's accomplishments, the White House touts "over 500,000 new jobs."

"It's an artificial barrier", he sniffed the other day. "It's not very meaningful", he said.

Trying to unsuccessfully tackle repeal and replacement of Obamacare early on in his presidency might have cost Trump his honeymoon period - the early period in office when USA presidents typically enjoy higher approval ratings.

Kitty Hawk's Flyer isn't the flying car you were promised
Enter a Slovakian start-up AeroMobil that launched its flying auto in 2014 but when it test the vehicle in 2015 it crashed. You don't need a pilot's license to fly it, the company says, adding that you'll learn how to operate it in " minutes ".

On Wednesday, the White House plans to take a stab at another item on the 100-day agenda: an outline for tax reform. The Democratic Party's problems run somewhat deeper at the state level, which can not be ignored, but nationally it will not take much for Democrats to recapture one or both houses of Congress by the end of Trump's term. Democrats loudly went after Arizona Senator Jeff Flake at a recent gathering. They'll continue to turn up at GOP and Democratic congresspersons town halls and shout them down on any defense they try to make of Trump's policies and actions.

Trump is on the verge of making a decision on increasing troop levels in Afghanistan following a comprehensive review of USA strategy, according to a senior United States official, who declined to speculate when precisely Trump would announce his decision. Lawmakers from both parties were inclined to act quickly and did, even as they fought over the details of the big stimulus package that defined Obama's early days.

"When it came time to, as an example, send out the 59 missiles, the Tomahawks in Syria", Trump said of his decision to strike a Syrian air base in retaliation for a chemical weapons attack.

"One thing that's unique to the Trump presidency is maybe his lack of anticipation of some of these constraints", Thrower said. Democrats have threatened to block a continuing resolution needed to keep the government running and allow a shutdown to occur rather than vote to fund the border wall. For example, he's withdrawn the USA from the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, created a violent crime task force and lifted restrictions on fossil fuel development.

The New Jersey governor concluded that he would give Trump a B "first and foremost because of Neil Gorsuch". "I think that's going to start happening now".

Cabinet officials and other surrogates are being dispatched across the country to talk up the administration's early doings, boasting as White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus did on Sunday of Trump fulfilling his promises at a "breakneck speed". "You want your strategy as president to unite your friends and to divide your foes", said Brookings analyst William Galston. "Up till now the president has done exactly the reverse, and he didn't intend to, but he did".

Trump's numerous policy pivots and resets also raise questions about the very definition of his fluid brand of "Trumpism" - which revolves around his ubiquitous "America First" slogan, a seemingly simple idea that is nevertheless tough to explain.