Spicer Grasps for Russia Answers as Pressure Mounts on Trump

Spicer Grasps for Russia Answers as Pressure Mounts on Trump

The remarks came a day after the New York Times reported that two White House officials helped provide Nunes with intelligence reports that showed President Trump and his associates were incidentally swept up in foreign surveillance by USA spy agencies.

The White House attempted to put the issue to rest Friday by inviting the heads of the House Intelligence Committee to view the intelligence reports supplied to Nunes, which he used to claim that American intelligence agencies had inappropriately collected information on Trump staffers. The way Nunes rolled out this new development was also bungled, not sharing this information with other members of the committee and then taking a stroll to the White House to brief the president.

A former Obama administration official responsible for the Defense Department's Russian Federation policy has come in the White House's crosshairs for what they have characterized as her admission that Obama-era officials were collecting intelligence on President Donald Trump and his transition team.

Asked about those documents later, Spicer scolded reports for being obsessed with the "process" over the "substance" of Nunes' findings, which he claimed Nunes had obtained legally - and, it was revealed later, with the help of the White House.

Still, any time a key member of the staff exits, it raises questions about the cohesiveness of the president's team and the confidence he has in them.

When asked about the Trump-Russia scandal earlier this week, he then deflected to her again, saying, without evidence or sourcing his information, "I think there's probably more evidence that CNN colluded with the Clinton campaign to give her debate questions than Trump campaign gave any kind of collusion".

"Thank you, I appreciate the timeline", Spicer said, visibly frustrated. I mean, if a deal is worked out, when might we hear from Michael Flynn? The change would have given his White House advisers more control about the assessments given to him and sidelined some of the conclusions made by intelligence professionals.

Trump fired national security adviser Michael Flynn following news reports that Flynn misled the White House about his contacts with Russia's ambassador to the U.S. But the White House says the problem is that Flynn's conversations were in the news at all.

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What would even be sweeter obviously is if the Raiders actually played in a Super Bowl in Las Vegas, whenever it happens. That's a short trip and it's a fun trip. "No way I'd pay my money to attend a game".

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Nunes has said the information he received did not support that allegation, which has also been disputed by Obama and top intelligence officials.

In the Wall Street Journal, Peggy Noonan settles for a workmanlike "stupid" for Trump's tweets, but tries on "freakish" to describe Trump the character. She did not say that Obama or member of his administration had ordered surveillance of Trump Tower or leaked any classified information.

Schiff also called on the White House to explain why it initially shared the documents with only Nunes, rather than all of the interested parties.

"Was anyone else at the White House involved in these activities, and if so, who?" the lawmaker added. Top Democrat Rep. Adam Schiff of California argued the intelligence committee is incapable of conducting a fair and impartial investigation due to the congressman's close ties with Trump's administration.

Team Trump may have managed to navigate the politics of 2016, but the maze of the vast federal bureaucracy Steve Bannon seeks to "deconstruct" might be the ultimate undoing of Trump's White House.

The White House has also tried to link Clinton to Russia's purchase of a controlling stake in a mining company with operations in the US, arguing that she was responsible for "selling off one-fifth of our country's uranium".